Bakery Order List for Thurs 18 May out now

Posted on Posted in Bakery Order List, News

We hope you’ve got to grips by now with our Fougasse – whether you are sneaking it into the cinema, or ripping it to bits on the lunch table. One of our customers on FB is ‘particularly enjoying’ it – do let us know what you think, whether in herb or plain and simple versions. And babka-lovers, what do you think of the Barfi? It beat a number of other recipes in the trials, but the acid test is surely what our customers think.

Last week for our specials, so make sure that you don’t miss out – they freeze well, assuming you are disciplined enough to get them that far!

Order and pay online at http://breadincommon.com/weekly-bread-order-form/
or email us at hello@breadincommon.com by 6pm on Weds 17 May, pick up your order freshly baked that day on Thurs 18 May from 1-6pm.

Andrew Whitley, the baker behind the Real Bread movement, posted this great description of fougasse, as well as his recipe which is here :

Fougasse has one of the most distinctive shapes in the world of bread. Its name suggests some similarity with Italian focaccia (from the Latin ‘focus’ meaning fire or hearth) and it is similarly baked from a flat soft piece of dough. But it is cut and stretched before baking in a way that creates its characteristic ‘ladder’ or ‘tree’ shapes.

Baked hard on the sole of a wood-fired oven, fougasse is designed for crust (like the baguette) and for easy breaking without a knife. The late great Lionel Poilâne suggests that it may have served as a way of testing the oven temperature. It would have baked very quickly due to its opened-out shape and presumably the baker could tell the rough temperature of his oven by the speed at which his fougasse took colour.

Fougasse’s home is in the South of France, especially the Pyrénées-Orientales, but nowadays it is found much further afield. Though fundamentally a plain bread, it is often enriched with olives or walnuts. It isn’t often seen in supermarkets (in the UK), perhaps because it doesn’t keep very well due to the high ratio of crust to crumb.

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